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MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

Use the graph below to answer the question that follows.

If the polygon shown above is reflected about the y axis and then rotated 90 degrees clockwise about the origin, which of the following graphs is the result?

A
Hint:
Try following the point (1,4) to see where it goes after each transformation.
B
C
Hint:
Make sure you're reflecting in the correct axis.
D
Hint:
Make sure you're rotating the correct direction.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze and apply geometric transformations (e.g., translations, rotations, reflections, dilations); relate them to concepts of symmetry, similarity, and congruence; and use these concepts to solve problems (Objective 0024).
Question 2

In March of 2012, 1 dollar was worth the same as 0.761 Euros, and 1 dollar was also worth the same as 83.03 Japanese Yen.  Which of the expressions below gives the number of Yen that are worth 1 Euro?

A
\( \large {83}.0{3}\cdot 0.{761}\)
Hint:
This equation gives less than the number of yen per dollar, but 1 Euro is worth more than 1 dollar.
B
\( \large \dfrac{0.{761}}{{83}.0{3}}\)
Hint:
Number is way too small.
C
\( \large \dfrac{{83}.0{3}}{0.{761}}\)
Hint:
One strategy here is to use easier numbers, say 1 dollar = .5 Euros and 100 yen, then 1 Euro would be 200 Yen (change the numbers in the equations and see what works). Another is to use dimensional analysis: we want # yen per Euro, or yen/Euro = yen/dollar \(\times\) dollar/Euro = \(83.03 \times \dfrac {1}{0.761}\)
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{0.{761}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{{83}.0{3}}\)
Hint:
Number is way too small.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze the relationships among proportions, constant rates, and linear functions (Objective 0022).
Question 3

Which of the numbers below is not equivalent to 4%?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{25}\)
Hint:
1/25=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
B
\( \large \dfrac{4}{100}\)
Hint:
4/100=4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
C
\( \large 0.4\)
Hint:
0.4=40% so this is not equal to 4%
D
\( \large 0.04\)
Hint:
0.04=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
Question 3 Explanation: 
Converting between fractions, decimals, and percents (Objective 0017).
Question 4

If two fair coins are flipped, what is the probability that one will come up heads and the other tails?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{4}\)
Hint:
Think of the coins as a penny and a dime, and list all possibilities.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{3} \)
Hint:
This is a very common misconception. There are three possible outcomes -- both heads, both tails, and one of each -- but they are not equally likely. Think of the coins as a penny and a dime, and list all possibilities.
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{2}\)
Hint:
The possibilities are HH, HT, TH, TT, and all are equally likely. Two of the four have one of each coin, so the probability is 2/4=1/2.
D
\( \large \dfrac{3}{4}\)
Hint:
Think of the coins as a penny and a dime, and list all possibilities.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Calculate the probabilities of simple and compound events and of independent and dependent events (Objective 0026).
Question 5

There are 15 students for every teacher.  Let t represent the number of teachers and let s represent the number of students.  Which of the following equations is correct?

A
\( \large t=s+15\)
Hint:
When there are 2 teachers, how many students should there be? Do those values satisfy this equation?
B
\( \large s=t+15\)
Hint:
When there are 2 teachers, how many students should there be? Do those values satisfy this equation?
C
\( \large t=15s\)
Hint:
This is a really easy mistake to make, which comes from transcribing directly from English, "1 teachers equals 15 students." To see that it's wrong, plug in s=2; do you really need 30 teachers for 2 students? To avoid this mistake, insert the word "number," "Number of teachers equals 15 times number of students" is more clearly problematic.
D
\( \large s=15t\)
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Select the linear equation that best models a real-world situation (Objective 0022).
There are 5 questions to complete.

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