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MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

An above-ground swimming pool is in the shape of a regular hexagonal prism, is one meter high, and holds 65 cubic meters of water.  A second pool has a base that is also a regular hexagon, but with sides twice as long as the sides in the first pool.  This second pool is also one meter high.  How much water will the second pool hold?

A
\( \large 65\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
A bigger pool would hold more water.
B
\( \large 65\cdot 2\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
Try a simpler example, say doubling the sides of the base of a 1 x 1 x 1 cube.
C
\( \large 65\cdot 4\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
If we think of the pool as filled with 1 x 1 x 1 cubes (and some fractions of cubes), then scaling to the larger pool changes each 1 x 1 x 1 cube to a 2 x 2 x 1 prism, or multiplies volume by 4.
D
\( \large 65\cdot 8\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
Try a simpler example, say doubling the sides of the base of a 1 x 1 x 1 cube.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic: Determine how the characteristics (e.g., area, volume) of geometric figures and shapes are affected by changes in their dimensions (Objective 0023).
Question 2

A car is traveling at 60 miles per hour.  Which of the expressions below could be used to compute how many feet the car travels in 1 second?  Note that 1 mile = 5,280 feet.

A
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot 5280\dfrac{\text{feet}}{\text{mile}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{minutes}}{\text{hour}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{seconds}}{\text{minute}} \)
Hint:
This answer is not in feet/second.
B
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot 5280\dfrac{\text{feet}}{\text{mile}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{hour}}{\text{minutes}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{minute}}{\text{seconds}} \)
Hint:
This is the only choice where the answer is in feet per second and the unit conversions are correct.
C
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{5280}\dfrac{\text{foot}}{\text{miles}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{hours}}{\text{minute}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{minute}}{\text{seconds}}\)
Hint:
Are there really 60 hours in a minute?
D
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{5280}\dfrac{\text{mile}}{\text{feet}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{minutes}}{\text{hour}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{minute}}{\text{seconds}}\)
Hint:
This answer is not in feet/second.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Use unit conversions and dimensional analysis to solve measurement problems (Objective 0023).
Question 3

Use the problem below to answer the question that follows:

T shirts are on sale for 20% off. Tasha paid $8.73 for a shirt.  What is the regular price of the shirt? There is no tax on clothing purchases under $175.

Let p represent the regular price of these t-shirt. Which of the following equations is correct?

A
\( \large 0.8p=\$8.73\)
Hint:
80% of the regular price = $8.73.
B
\( \large \$8.73+0.2*\$8.73=p\)
Hint:
The 20% off was off of the ORIGINAL price, not off the $8.73 (a lot of people make this mistake). Plus this is the same equation as in choice c.
C
\( \large 1.2*\$8.73=p\)
Hint:
The 20% off was off of the ORIGINAL price, not off the $8.73 (a lot of people make this mistake). Plus this is the same equation as in choice b.
D
\( \large p-0.2*\$8.73=p\)
Hint:
Subtract p from both sides of this equation, and you have -.2 x 8.73 =0.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Topics: Use algebra to solve word problems involving percents and identify variables, and derive algebraic expressions that represent real-world situations (Objective 0020).
Question 4

What is the perimeter of a right triangle with legs of lengths x and 2x?

A
\( \large 6x\)
Hint:
Use the Pythagorean Theorem.
B
\( \large 3x+5{{x}^{2}}\)
Hint:
Don't forget to take square roots when you use the Pythagorean Theorem.
C
\( \large 3x+\sqrt{5}{{x}^{2}}\)
Hint:
\(\sqrt {5 x^2}\) is not \(\sqrt {5}x^2\).
D
\( \large 3x+\sqrt{5}{{x}^{{}}}\)
Hint:
To find the hypotenuse, h, use the Pythagorean Theorem: \(x^2+(2x)^2=h^2.\) \(5x^2=h^2,h=\sqrt{5}x\). The perimeter is this plus x plus 2x.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and apply connections between algebra and geometry (e.g., the use of coordinate systems, the Pythagorean theorem) (Objective 0024).
Question 5

A family has four children.  What is the probability that two children are girls and two are boys?  Assume the the probability of having a boy (or a girl) is 50%.

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{2}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{4}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{5}\)
Hint:
Some configurations are more probable than others -- i.e. it's more likely to have two boys and two girls than all boys. Be sure you are weighting properly.
D
\( \large \dfrac{3}{8}\)
Hint:
There are two possibilities for each child, so there are \(2 \times 2 \times 2 \times 2 =16\) different configurations, e.g. from oldest to youngest BBBG, BGGB, GBBB, etc. Of these configurations, there are 6 with two boys and two girls (this is the combination \(_{4}C_{2}\) or "4 choose 2"): BBGG, BGBG, BGGB, GGBB, GBGB, and GBBG. Thus the probability is 6/16=3/8.
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply knowledge of combinations and permutations to the computation of probabilities (Objective 0026).
There are 5 questions to complete.

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