Hints will display for most wrong answers; explanations for most right answers.   You can attempt a question multiple times; it will only be scored correct if you get it right the first time.  To see five new questions, reload the page.

I used the official objectives and sample test to construct these questions, but cannot promise that they accurately reflect what’s on the real test.   Some of the sample questions were more convoluted than I could bear to write.   See terms of use.   See the MTEL Practice Test main page to view questions on a particular topic or to download paper practice tests.

MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

Cell phone plan A charges $3 per month plus $0.10 per minute. Cell phone plan B charges $29.99 per month, with no fee for the first 400 minutes and then $0.20 for each additional minute.

Which equation can be used to solve for the number of minutes, m (with m>400) that a person would have to spend on the phone each month in order for the bills for plan A and plan B to be equal?

A
\( \large 3.10m=400+0.2m\)
Hint:
These are the numbers in the problem, but this equation doesn't make sense. If you don't know how to make an equation, try plugging in an easy number like m=500 minutes to see if each side equals what it should.
B
\( \large 3+0.1m=29.99+.20m\)
Hint:
Doesn't account for the 400 free minutes.
C
\( \large 3+0.1m=400+29.99+.20(m-400)\)
Hint:
Why would you add 400 minutes and $29.99? If you don't know how to make an equation, try plugging in an easy number like m=500 minutes to see if each side equals what it should.
D
\( \large 3+0.1m=29.99+.20(m-400)\)
Hint:
The left side is $3 plus $0.10 times the number of minutes. The right is $29.99 plus $0.20 times the number of minutes over 400.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Identify variables and derive algebraic expressions that represent real-world situations (Objective 0020).
Question 2

Kendra is trying to decide which fraction is greater, \(  \dfrac{4}{7}\) or \(  \dfrac{5}{8}\). Which of the following answers shows the best reasoning?

A

\( \dfrac{4}{7}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{7}\)away from 1, and \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{8}\)away from 1. Since eighth‘s are smaller than seventh‘s, \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is closer to 1, and is the greater of the two fractions.

B

\( 7-4=3\) and \( 8-5=3\), so the fractions are equal.

Hint:
Not how to compare fractions. By this logic, 1/2 and 3/4 are equal, but 1/2 and 2/4 are not.
C

\( 4\times 8=32\) and \( 7\times 5=35\). Since \( 32<35\) , \( \dfrac{5}{8}<\dfrac{4}{7}\)

Hint:
Starts out as something that works, but the conclusion is wrong. 4/7 = 32/56 and 5/8 = 35/56. The cross multiplication gives the numerators, and 35/56 is bigger.
D

\( 4<5\) and \( 7<8\), so \( \dfrac{4}{7}<\dfrac{5}{8}\)

Hint:
Conclusion is correct, logic is wrong. With this reasoning, 1/2 would be less than 2/100,000.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topics: Comparing fractions, and understanding the meaning of fractions (Objective 0017).
Question 3

Use the table below to answer the question that follows:

Each number in the table above represents a value W that is determined by the values of x and y.  For example, when x=3 and y=1, W=5.  What is the value of W when x=9 and y=14?  Assume that the patterns in the table continue as shown.

A
\( \large W=-5\)
Hint:
When y is even, W is even.
B
\( \large W=4\)
Hint:
Note that when x increases by 1, W increases by 2, and when y increases by 1, W decreases by 1. At x=y=0, W=0, so at x=9, y=14, W has increased by \(9 \times 2\) and decreased by 14, or W=18-14=4.
C
\( \large W=6\)
Hint:
Try fixing x or y at 0, and start by finding W for x=0 y=14 or x=9, y=0.
D
\( \large W=32\)
Hint:
Try fixing x or y at 0, and start by finding W for x=0 y=14 or x=9, y=0.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and extend patterns using a variety of representations (e.g., verbal, numeric, pictorial, algebraic) (Objective 0021)
Question 4

Given that 10 cm is approximately equal to 4 inches, which of the following expressions models a way to find out approximately how many inches are equivalent to 350 cm?

A
\( \large 350\times \left( \dfrac{10}{4} \right)\)
Hint:
The final result should be smaller than 350, and this answer is bigger.
B
\( \large 350\times \left( \dfrac{4}{10} \right)\)
Hint:
Dimensional analysis can help here: \(350 \text{cm} \times \dfrac{4 \text{in}}{10 \text{cm}}\). The cm's cancel and the answer is in inches.
C
\( \large (10-4) \times 350 \)
Hint:
This answer doesn't make much sense. Try with a simpler example (e.g. 20 cm not 350 cm) to make sure that your logic makes sense.
D
\( \large (350-10) \times 4\)
Hint:
This answer doesn't make much sense. Try with a simpler example (e.g. 20 cm not 350 cm) to make sure that your logic makes sense.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Applying fractions to word problems (Objective 0017) This problem is similar to one on the official sample test for that objective, but it might fit better into unit conversion and dimensional analysis (Objective 0023: Measurement)
Question 5

The picture below represents a board with pegs on it, where the closest distance between two pegs is 1 cm.  What is the area of the pentagon shown?

A
\( \large 8\text{ c}{{\text{m}}^{2}} \)
Hint:
Don't just count the dots inside, that doesn't give the area. Try adding segments so that the slanted lines become the diagonals of rectangles.
B
\( \large 11\text{ c}{{\text{m}}^{2}}\)
Hint:
Try adding segments so that the slanted lines become the diagonals of rectangles.
C
\( \large 11.5\text{ c}{{\text{m}}^{2}}\)
Hint:
An easy way to do this problem is to use Pick's Theorem (of course, it's better if you understand why Pick's theorem works): area = # pegs inside + half # pegs on the border - 1. In this case 8+9/2-1=11.5. A more appropriate strategy for elementary classrooms is to add segments; here's one way.

There are 20 1x1 squares enclosed, and the total area of the triangles that need to be subtracted is 8.5
D
\( \large 12.5\text{ c}{{\text{m}}^{2}}\)
Hint:
Try adding segments so that the slanted lines become the diagonals of rectangles.
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topics: Calculate measurements and derive and use formulas for calculating the areas of geometric shapes and figures (Objective 0023).
There are 5 questions to complete.

If you found a mistake or have comments on a particular question, please contact me (please copy and paste at least part of the question into the form, as the numbers change depending on how quizzes are displayed).   General comments can be left here.