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MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

What set of transformations will transform the leftmost image into the rightmost image?

 
A

A 90 degree clockwise rotation about (2,1) followed by a translation of two units to the right.

Hint:
Part of the figure would move below the x-axis with these transformations.
B

A translation 3 units up, followed by a reflection about the line y=x.

Hint:
See what happens to the point (5,1) under this set of transformations.
C

A 90 degree clockwise rotation about (5,1), followed by a translation of 2 units up.

D

A 90 degree clockwise rotation about (2,1) followed by a translation of 2 units to the right.

Hint:
See what happens to the point (3,3) under this set of transformations.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic:Analyze and apply geometric transformations (e.g., translations, rotations, reflections, dilations) (Objective 0024).
Question 2

The histogram below shows the number of pairs of footware owned by a group of college students.

Which of the following statements can be inferred from the graph above?

A

The median number of pairs of footware owned is between 50 and 60 pairs.

Hint:
The same number of data points are less than the median as are greater than the median -- but on this histogram, clearly more than half the students own less than 50 pairs of shoes, so the median is less than 50.
B

The mode of the number of pairs of footware owned is 20.

Hint:
The mode is the most common number of pairs of footwear owned. We can't tell it from this histogram because each bar represents 10 different numbers-- perhaps 8 students each own each number from 10 to 19, but 40 students own exactly 6 pairs of shoes.... or perhaps not....
C

The mean number of pairs of footware owned is less than the median number of pairs of footware owned.

Hint:
This is a right skewed distribution, and so the mean is bigger than the median -- the few large values on the right pull up the mean, but have little effect on the median.
D

The median number of pairs of footware owned is between 10 and 20.

Hint:
There are approximately 230 students represented in this survey, and the 41st through 120th lowest values are between 10 and 20 -- thus the middle value is in that range.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topics: Analyze and interpret various graphic and data representations, and use measures of central tendency (e.g., mean, median, mode) and spread to describe and interpret real-world data (Objective 0025).
Question 3

A homeowner is planning to tile the kitchen floor with tiles that measure 6 inches by 8 inches.  The kitchen floor is a rectangle that measures 10 ft by 12 ft, and there are no gaps between the tiles.  How many tiles does the homeowner need?

A

30

Hint:
The floor is 120 sq feet, and the tiles are smaller than 1 sq foot. Also, remember that 1 sq foot is 12 \(\times\) 12=144 sq inches.
B

120

Hint:
The floor is 120 sq feet, and the tiles are smaller than 1 sq foot.
C

300

Hint:
Recheck your calculations.
D

360

Hint:
One way to do this is to note that 6 inches = 1/2 foot and 8 inches = 2/3 foot, so the area of each tile is 1/2 \(\times\) 2/3=1/3 sq foot, or each square foot of floor requires 3 tiles. The area of the floor is 120 square feet. Note that the tiles would fit evenly oriented in either direction, parallel to the walls.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Topic: Estimate and calculate measurements, use unit conversions to solve measurement problems, solve measurement problems in real-world situations (Objective 0023).
Question 4

Some children explored the diagonals in 2 x 2 squares on pages of a calendar (where all four squares have numbers in them).  They conjectured that the sum of the diagonals is always equal; in the example below, 8+16=9+15.

 

Which of the equations below could best be used to explain why the children€™s conjecture is correct?

A
\( \large 8x+16x=9x+15x\)
Hint:
What would x represent in this case? Make sure you can describe in words what x represents.
B
\( \large x+(x+2)=(x+1)+(x+1)\)
Hint:
What would x represent in this case? Make sure you can describe in words what x represents.
C
\( \large x+(x+8)=(x+1)+(x+7)\)
Hint:
x is the number in the top left square, x+8 is one below and to the right, x+1 is to the right of x, and x+7 is below x.
D
\( \large x+8+16=x+9+15\)
Hint:
What would x represent in this case? Make sure you can describe in words what x represents.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and apply the concepts of variable, equality, and equation to express relationships algebraically (Objective 0020).
Question 5

If  x  is an integer, which of the following must also be an integer?

A
\( \large \dfrac{x}{2}\)
Hint:
If x is odd, then \( \dfrac{x}{2} \) is not an integer, e.g. 3/2 = 1.5.
B
\( \large \dfrac{2}{x}\)
Hint:
Only an integer if x = -2, -1, 1, or 2.
C
\( \large-x\)
Hint:
-1 times any integer is still an integer.
D
\(\large\sqrt{x}\)
Hint:
Usually not an integer, e.g. \( \sqrt{2} \approx 1.414 \).
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Integers (Objective 0016)
Question 6

What fraction of the area of the picture below is shaded?

A
\( \large \dfrac{17}{24}\)
Hint:
You might try adding segments so each quadrant is divided into 6 pieces with equal area -- there will be 24 regions, not all the same shape, but all the same area, with 17 of them shaded (for the top left quarter, you could also first change the diagonal line to a horizontal or vertical line that divides the square in two equal pieces and shade one) .
B
\( \large \dfrac{3}{4}\)
Hint:
Be sure you're taking into account the different sizes of the pieces.
C
\( \large \dfrac{2}{3}\)
Hint:
The bottom half of the picture is 2/3 shaded, and the top half is more than 2/3 shaded, so this answer is too small.
D
\( \large \dfrac{17}{6} \)
Hint:
This answer is bigger than 1, so doesn't make any sense. Be sure you are using the whole picture, not one quadrant, as the unit.
Question 6 Explanation: 
Topic: Models of Fractions (Objective 0017)
Question 7

Cell phone plan A charges $3 per month plus $0.10 per minute. Cell phone plan B charges $29.99 per month, with no fee for the first 400 minutes and then $0.20 for each additional minute.

Which equation can be used to solve for the number of minutes, m (with m>400) that a person would have to spend on the phone each month in order for the bills for plan A and plan B to be equal?

A
\( \large 3.10m=400+0.2m\)
Hint:
These are the numbers in the problem, but this equation doesn't make sense. If you don't know how to make an equation, try plugging in an easy number like m=500 minutes to see if each side equals what it should.
B
\( \large 3+0.1m=29.99+.20m\)
Hint:
Doesn't account for the 400 free minutes.
C
\( \large 3+0.1m=400+29.99+.20(m-400)\)
Hint:
Why would you add 400 minutes and $29.99? If you don't know how to make an equation, try plugging in an easy number like m=500 minutes to see if each side equals what it should.
D
\( \large 3+0.1m=29.99+.20(m-400)\)
Hint:
The left side is $3 plus $0.10 times the number of minutes. The right is $29.99 plus $0.20 times the number of minutes over 400.
Question 7 Explanation: 
Identify variables and derive algebraic expressions that represent real-world situations (Objective 0020).
Question 8

The least common multiple of 60 and N is 1260. Which of the following could be the prime factorization of N?

A
\( \large2\cdot 5\cdot 7\)
Hint:
1260 is divisible by 9 and 60 is not, so N must be divisible by 9 for 1260 to be the LCM.
B
\( \large{{2}^{3}}\cdot {{3}^{2}}\cdot 5 \cdot 7\)
Hint:
1260 is not divisible by 8, so it isn't a multiple of this N.
C
\( \large3 \cdot 5 \cdot 7\)
Hint:
1260 is divisible by 9 and 60 is not, so N must be divisible by 9 for 1260 to be the LCM.
D
\( \large{{3}^{2}}\cdot 5\cdot 7\)
Hint:
\(1260=2^2 \cdot 3^2 \cdot 5 \cdot 7\) and \(60=2^2 \cdot 3 \cdot 5\). In order for 1260 to be the LCM, N has to be a multiple of \(3^2\) and of 7 (because 60 is not a multiple of either of these). N also cannot introduce a factor that would require the LCM to be larger (as in choice b).
Question 8 Explanation: 
Topic: Least Common Multiple (Objective 0018)
Question 9

The prime factorization of  n can be written as n=pqr, where p, q, and r are distinct prime numbers.  How many factors does n have, including 1 and itself?

A
\( \large3\)
Hint:
1, p, q, r, and pqr are already 5, so this isn't enough. You might try plugging in p=2, q=3, and r=5 to help with this problem.
B
\( \large5\)
Hint:
Don't forget pq, etc. You might try plugging in p=2, q=3, and r=5 to help with this problem.
C
\( \large6\)
Hint:
You might try plugging in p=2, q=3, and r=5 to help with this problem.
D
\( \large8\)
Hint:
1, p, q, r, pq, pr, qr, pqr.
Question 9 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize uses of prime factorization of a number (Objective 0018).
Question 10

Which of the following nets will not fold into a cube?

A
Hint:
If you have trouble visualizing, cut them out and fold (during the test, you can tear paper to approximate).
B
C
Hint:
If you have trouble visualizing, cut them out and fold (during the test, you can tear paper to approximate).
D
Hint:
If you have trouble visualizing, cut them out and fold (during the test, you can tear paper to approximate).
Question 10 Explanation: 
Topic: Match three-dimensional figures and their two-dimensional representations (e.g., nets, projections, perspective drawings) (Objective 0024).
There are 10 questions to complete.

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