10 Random Questions

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I used the official objectives and sample test to construct these questions, but cannot promise that they accurately reflect what’s on the real test.   Some of the sample questions were more convoluted than I could bear to write.   See terms of use.   See the MTEL Practice Test main page to view questions on a particular topic or to download paper practice tests.

MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

There are six gumballs in a bag – two red and four green.  Six children take turns picking a gumball out of the bag without looking.   They do not return any gumballs to the bag.  What is the probability that the first two children to pick from the bag pick the red gumballs?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{3}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that the first child picks a red gumball, but not that the first two children pick red gumballs.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{8}\)
Hint:
Are you adding things that you should be multiplying?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{9}\)
Hint:
This would be the probability if the gumballs were returned to the bag.
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{15}\)
Hint:
The probability that the first child picks red is 2/6 = 1/3. Then there are 5 gumballs in the bag, one red, so the probability that the second child picks red is 1/5. Thus 1/5 of the time, after the first child picks red, the second does too, so the probability is 1/5 x 1/3 = 1/15.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic: Calculate the probabilities of simple and compound events and of independent and dependent events (Objective 0026).
Question 2

A car is traveling at 60 miles per hour.  Which of the expressions below could be used to compute how many feet the car travels in 1 second?  Note that 1 mile = 5,280 feet.

A
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot 5280\dfrac{\text{feet}}{\text{mile}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{minutes}}{\text{hour}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{seconds}}{\text{minute}} \)
Hint:
This answer is not in feet/second.
B
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot 5280\dfrac{\text{feet}}{\text{mile}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{hour}}{\text{minutes}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{minute}}{\text{seconds}} \)
Hint:
This is the only choice where the answer is in feet per second and the unit conversions are correct.
C
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{5280}\dfrac{\text{foot}}{\text{miles}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{hours}}{\text{minute}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{minute}}{\text{seconds}}\)
Hint:
Are there really 60 hours in a minute?
D
\( \large 60\dfrac{\text{miles}}{\text{hour}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{5280}\dfrac{\text{mile}}{\text{feet}}\cdot 60\dfrac{\text{minutes}}{\text{hour}}\cdot \dfrac{1}{60}\dfrac{\text{minute}}{\text{seconds}}\)
Hint:
This answer is not in feet/second.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Use unit conversions and dimensional analysis to solve measurement problems (Objective 0023).
Question 3

Which of the numbers below is not equivalent to 4%?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{25}\)
Hint:
1/25=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
B
\( \large \dfrac{4}{100}\)
Hint:
4/100=4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
C
\( \large 0.4\)
Hint:
0.4=40% so this is not equal to 4%
D
\( \large 0.04\)
Hint:
0.04=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
Question 3 Explanation: 
Converting between fractions, decimals, and percents (Objective 0017).
Question 4

Which of the following is an irrational number?

A
\( \large \sqrt[3]{8}\)
Hint:
This answer is the cube root of 8. Since 2 x 2 x 2 =8, this is equal to 2, which is rational because 2 = 2/1.
B
\( \large \sqrt{8}\)
Hint:
It is not trivial to prove that this is irrational, but you can get this answer by eliminating the other choices.
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{8}\)
Hint:
1/8 is the RATIO of two integers, so it is rational.
D
\( \large -8\)
Hint:
Negative integers are also rational, -8 = -8/1, a ratio of integers.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Identifying rational and irrational numbers (Objective 0016).
Question 5

A cylindrical soup can has diameter 7 cm and height 11 cm. The can holds g grams of soup.   How many grams of the same soup could a cylindrical can with diameter 14 cm and height 33 cm hold?

A
\( \large 6g\)
Hint:
You must scale in all three dimensions.
B
\( \large 12g\)
Hint:
Height is multiplied by 3, and diameter and radius are multiplied by 2. Since the radius is squared, final result is multiplied by \(2^2\times 3=12\).
C
\( \large 18g\)
Hint:
Don't square the height scale factor.
D
\( \large 36g\)
Hint:
Don't square the height scale factor.
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Determine how the characteristics (e.g., area, volume) of geometric figures and shapes are affected by changes in their dimensions (Objective 0023).
Question 6

An above-ground swimming pool is in the shape of a regular hexagonal prism, is one meter high, and holds 65 cubic meters of water.  A second pool has a base that is also a regular hexagon, but with sides twice as long as the sides in the first pool.  This second pool is also one meter high.  How much water will the second pool hold?

A
\( \large 65\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
A bigger pool would hold more water.
B
\( \large 65\cdot 2\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
Try a simpler example, say doubling the sides of the base of a 1 x 1 x 1 cube.
C
\( \large 65\cdot 4\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
If we think of the pool as filled with 1 x 1 x 1 cubes (and some fractions of cubes), then scaling to the larger pool changes each 1 x 1 x 1 cube to a 2 x 2 x 1 prism, or multiplies volume by 4.
D
\( \large 65\cdot 8\text{ }{{\text{m}}^{3}}\)
Hint:
Try a simpler example, say doubling the sides of the base of a 1 x 1 x 1 cube.
Question 6 Explanation: 
Topic: Determine how the characteristics (e.g., area, volume) of geometric figures and shapes are affected by changes in their dimensions (Objective 0023).
Question 7

Which of the following is equivalent to

\( \large A-B+C\div D\times E\)?

A
\( \large A-B-\dfrac{C}{DE} \)
Hint:
In the order of operations, multiplication and division have the same priority, so do them left to right; same with addition and subtraction.
B
\( \large A-B+\dfrac{CE}{D}\)
Hint:
In practice, you're better off using parentheses than writing an expression like the one in the question. The PEMDAS acronym that many people memorize is misleading. Multiplication and division have equal priority and are done left to right. They have higher priority than addition and subtraction. Addition and subtraction also have equal priority and are done left to right.
C
\( \large \dfrac{AE-BE+CE}{D}\)
Hint:
Use order of operations, don't just compute left to right.
D
\( \large A-B+\dfrac{C}{DE}\)
Hint:
In the order of operations, multiplication and division have the same priority, so do them left to right
Question 7 Explanation: 
Topic: Justify algebraic manipulations by application of the properties of order of operations (Objective 0020).
Question 8

M is a multiple of 26.  Which of the following cannot be true?

A

M is odd.

Hint:
All multiples of 26 are also multiples of 2, so they must be even.
B

M is a multiple of 3.

Hint:
3 x 26 is a multiple of both 3 and 26.
C

M is 26.

Hint:
1 x 26 is a multiple of 26.
D

M is 0.

Hint:
0 x 26 is a multiple of 26.
Question 8 Explanation: 
Topic: Characteristics of composite numbers (Objective 0018).
Question 9

Use the graph below to answer the question that follows:

The graph above represents the equation \( \large 3x+Ay=B\), where A and B are integers.  What are the values of A and B?

A
\( \large A = -2, B= 6\)
Hint:
Plug in (2,0) to get B=6, then plug in (0,-3) to get A=-2.
B
\( \large A = 2, B = 6\)
Hint:
Try plugging (0,-3) into this equation.
C
\( \large A = -1.5, B=-3\)
Hint:
The problem said that A and B were integers and -1.5 is not an integer. Don't try to use slope-intercept form.
D
\( \large A = 2, B = -3\)
Hint:
Try plugging (2,0) into this equation.
Question 9 Explanation: 
Topic: Find a linear equation that represents a graph (Objective 0022).
Question 10

Elena is going to use a calculator to check whether or not 267 is prime. She will pick certain divisors, and then find 267 divided by each, and see if she gets a whole number. If she never gets a whole number, then she’s found a prime. Which numbers does Elena NEED to check before she can stop checking and be sure she has a prime?

A

All natural numbers from 2 to 266.

Hint:
She only needs to check primes -- checking the prime factors of any composite is enough to look for divisors. As a test taking strategy, the other three choices involve primes, so worth thinking about.
B

All primes from 2 to 266 .

Hint:
Remember, factors come in pairs (except for square root factors), so she would first find the smaller of the pair and wouldn't need to check the larger.
C

All primes from 2 to 133 .

Hint:
She doesn't need to check this high. Factors come in pairs, and something over 100 is going to be paired with something less than 3, so she will find that earlier.
D

All primes from \( \large 2\) to \( \large \sqrt{267}\).

Hint:
\(\sqrt{267} \times \sqrt{267}=267\). Any other pair of factors will have one factor less than \( \sqrt{267}\) and one greater, so she only needs to check up to \( \sqrt{267}\).
Question 10 Explanation: 
Topic: Identify prime and composite numbers (Objective 0018).
There are 10 questions to complete.

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