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MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

Given that 10 cm is approximately equal to 4 inches, which of the following expressions models a way to find out approximately how many inches are equivalent to 350 cm?

A
\( \large 350\times \left( \dfrac{10}{4} \right)\)
Hint:
The final result should be smaller than 350, and this answer is bigger.
B
\( \large 350\times \left( \dfrac{4}{10} \right)\)
Hint:
Dimensional analysis can help here: \(350 \text{cm} \times \dfrac{4 \text{in}}{10 \text{cm}}\). The cm's cancel and the answer is in inches.
C
\( \large (10-4) \times 350 \)
Hint:
This answer doesn't make much sense. Try with a simpler example (e.g. 20 cm not 350 cm) to make sure that your logic makes sense.
D
\( \large (350-10) \times 4\)
Hint:
This answer doesn't make much sense. Try with a simpler example (e.g. 20 cm not 350 cm) to make sure that your logic makes sense.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic: Applying fractions to word problems (Objective 0017) This problem is similar to one on the official sample test for that objective, but it might fit better into unit conversion and dimensional analysis (Objective 0023: Measurement)
Question 2

Below are front, side, and top views of a three-dimensional solid.

Which of the following could be the solid shown above?

A

A sphere

Hint:
All views would be circles.
B

A cylinder

C

A cone

Hint:
Two views would be triangles, not rectangles.
D

A pyramid

Hint:
How would one view be a circle?
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Match three-dimensional figures and their two-dimensional representations (e.g., nets, projections, perspective drawings) (Objective 0024).
Question 3

Which of the graphs below represent functions?

I. II. III. IV.   
A

I and IV only.

Hint:
There are vertical lines that go through 2 points in IV .
B

I and III only.

Hint:
Even though III is not continuous, it's still a function (assuming that vertical lines between the "steps" do not go through 2 points).
C

II and III only.

Hint:
Learn about the vertical line test.
D

I, II, and IV only.

Hint:
There are vertical lines that go through 2 points in II.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Understand the definition of function and various representations of functions (e.g., input/output machines, tables, graphs, mapping diagrams, formulas). (Objective 0021).
Question 4

Kendra is trying to decide which fraction is greater, \(  \dfrac{4}{7}\) or \(  \dfrac{5}{8}\). Which of the following answers shows the best reasoning?

A

\( \dfrac{4}{7}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{7}\)away from 1, and \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{8}\)away from 1. Since eighth‘s are smaller than seventh‘s, \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is closer to 1, and is the greater of the two fractions.

B

\( 7-4=3\) and \( 8-5=3\), so the fractions are equal.

Hint:
Not how to compare fractions. By this logic, 1/2 and 3/4 are equal, but 1/2 and 2/4 are not.
C

\( 4\times 8=32\) and \( 7\times 5=35\). Since \( 32<35\) , \( \dfrac{5}{8}<\dfrac{4}{7}\)

Hint:
Starts out as something that works, but the conclusion is wrong. 4/7 = 32/56 and 5/8 = 35/56. The cross multiplication gives the numerators, and 35/56 is bigger.
D

\( 4<5\) and \( 7<8\), so \( \dfrac{4}{7}<\dfrac{5}{8}\)

Hint:
Conclusion is correct, logic is wrong. With this reasoning, 1/2 would be less than 2/100,000.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topics: Comparing fractions, and understanding the meaning of fractions (Objective 0017).
Question 5

Four children randomly line up, single file.  What is the probability that they are in height order, with the shortest child in front?   All of the children are different heights.

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{4}\)
Hint:
Try a simpler question with 3 children -- call them big, medium, and small -- and list all the ways they could line up. Then see how to extend your logic to the problem with 4 children.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{256} \)
Hint:
Try a simpler question with 3 children -- call them big, medium, and small -- and list all the ways they could line up. Then see how to extend your logic to the problem with 4 children.
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{16}\)
Hint:
Try a simpler question with 3 children -- call them big, medium, and small -- and list all the ways they could line up. Then see how to extend your logic to the problem with 4 children.
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{24}\)
Hint:
The number of ways for the children to line up is \(4!=4 \times 3 \times 2 \times 1 =24\) -- there are 4 choices for who is first in line, then 3 for who is second, etc. Only one of these lines has the children in the order specified.
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply knowledge of combinations and permutations to the computation of probabilities (Objective 0026).
There are 5 questions to complete.

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