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MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice

Question 1

The picture below shows identical circles drawn on a piece of paper.  The rectangle represents an index card that is blocking your view of \( \dfrac{3}{5}\) of the circles on the paper.  How many circles are covered by the rectangle?

A

4

Hint:
The card blocks more than half of the circles, so this number is too small.
B

5

Hint:
The card blocks more than half of the circles, so this number is too small.
C

8

Hint:
The card blocks more than half of the circles, so this number is too small.
D

12

Hint:
2/5 of the circles or 8 circles are showing. Thus 4 circles represent 1/5 of the circles, and \(4 \times 5=20\) circles represent 5/5 or all the circles. Thus 12 circles are hidden.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic: Models of Fractions (Objective 0017)
Question 2

Which of the following is equal to eleven billion four hundred thousand?

A
\( \large 11,400,000\)
Hint:
That's eleven million four hundred thousand.
B
\(\large11,000,400,000\)
C
\( \large11,000,000,400,000\)
Hint:
That's eleven trillion four hundred thousand (although with British conventions; this answer is correct, but in the US, it isn't).
D
\( \large 11,400,000,000\)
Hint:
That's eleven billion four hundred million
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Place Value (Objective 0016)
Question 3

Use the four figures below to answer the question that follows:

How many of the figures pictured above have at least one line of reflective symmetry?

A
\( \large 1\)
B
\( \large 2\)
Hint:
The ellipse has 2 lines of reflective symmetry (horizontal and vertical, through the center) and the triangle has 3. The other two figures have rotational symmetry, but not reflective symmetry.
C
\( \large 3\)
D
\( \large 4\)
Hint:
All four have rotational symmetry, but not reflective symmetry.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze and apply geometric transformations (e.g., translations, rotations, reflections, dilations); relate them to concepts of symmetry, similarity, and congruence; and use these concepts to solve problems (Objective 0024).
Question 4

A family has four children.  What is the probability that two children are girls and two are boys?  Assume the the probability of having a boy (or a girl) is 50%.

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{2}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{4}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{5}\)
Hint:
Some configurations are more probable than others -- i.e. it's more likely to have two boys and two girls than all boys. Be sure you are weighting properly.
D
\( \large \dfrac{3}{8}\)
Hint:
There are two possibilities for each child, so there are \(2 \times 2 \times 2 \times 2 =16\) different configurations, e.g. from oldest to youngest BBBG, BGGB, GBBB, etc. Of these configurations, there are 6 with two boys and two girls (this is the combination \(_{4}C_{2}\) or "4 choose 2"): BBGG, BGBG, BGGB, GGBB, GBGB, and GBBG. Thus the probability is 6/16=3/8.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply knowledge of combinations and permutations to the computation of probabilities (Objective 0026).
Question 5

A solution requires 4 ml of saline for every 7 ml of medicine. How much saline would be required for 50 ml of medicine?

A
\( \large 28 \dfrac{4}{7}\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. The extra ml of saline requires 4 ml saline/ 7 ml medicine = 4/7 ml saline per 1 ml medicine.
B
\( \large 28 \dfrac{1}{4}\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. How much saline does the extra ml require?
C
\( \large 28 \dfrac{1}{7}\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. How much saline does the extra ml require?
D
\( \large 87.5\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. How much saline does the extra ml require?
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply proportional thinking to estimate quantities in real world situations (Objective 0019).
Question 6

The Venn Diagram below gives data on the number of seniors, athletes, and vegetarians in the student body at a college:

How many students at the college are seniors who are not vegetarians?

A
\( \large 137\)
Hint:
Doesn't include the senior athletes who are not vegetarians.
B
\( \large 167\)
C
\( \large 197\)
Hint:
That's all seniors, including vegetarians.
D
\( \large 279\)
Hint:
Includes all athletes who are not vegetarians, some of whom are not seniors.
Question 6 Explanation: 
Topic: Venn Diagrams (Objective 0025)
Question 7

Kendra is trying to decide which fraction is greater, \(  \dfrac{4}{7}\) or \(  \dfrac{5}{8}\). Which of the following answers shows the best reasoning?

A

\( \dfrac{4}{7}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{7}\)away from 1, and \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{8}\)away from 1. Since eighth‘s are smaller than seventh‘s, \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is closer to 1, and is the greater of the two fractions.

B

\( 7-4=3\) and \( 8-5=3\), so the fractions are equal.

Hint:
Not how to compare fractions. By this logic, 1/2 and 3/4 are equal, but 1/2 and 2/4 are not.
C

\( 4\times 8=32\) and \( 7\times 5=35\). Since \( 32<35\) , \( \dfrac{5}{8}<\dfrac{4}{7}\)

Hint:
Starts out as something that works, but the conclusion is wrong. 4/7 = 32/56 and 5/8 = 35/56. The cross multiplication gives the numerators, and 35/56 is bigger.
D

\( 4<5\) and \( 7<8\), so \( \dfrac{4}{7}<\dfrac{5}{8}\)

Hint:
Conclusion is correct, logic is wrong. With this reasoning, 1/2 would be less than 2/100,000.
Question 7 Explanation: 
Topics: Comparing fractions, and understanding the meaning of fractions (Objective 0017).
Question 8

Here is a method that a student used for subtraction:

Which of the following is correct?

A

The student used a method that worked for this problem and can be generalized to any subtraction problem.

Hint:
Note that this algorithm is taught as the "standard" algorithm in much of Europe (it's where the term "borrowing" came from -- you borrow on top and "pay back" on the bottom).
B

The student used a method that worked for this problem and that will work for any subtraction problem that only requires one regrouping; it will not work if more regrouping is required.

Hint:
Try some more examples.
C

The student used a method that worked for this problem and will work for all three-digit subtraction problems, but will not work for larger problems.

Hint:
Try some more examples.
D

The student used a method that does not work. The student made two mistakes that cancelled each other out and was lucky to get the right answer for this problem.

Hint:
Remember, there are many ways to do subtraction; there is no one "right" algorithm.
Question 8 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze and justify standard and non-standard computational techniques (Objective 0019).
Question 9

Which of the following values of x satisfies the inequality \( \large \left| {{(x+2)}^{3}} \right|<3?\)

A
\( \large x=-3\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(-3+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {(-1)}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | -1 \right |=1 \) .
B
\( \large x=0\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(0+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {2}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | 8 \right | \) =\( 8\)
C
\( \large x=-4\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(-4+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {(-2)}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | -8 \right | \) =\( 8\)
D
\( \large x=1\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(1+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {3}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | 27 \right | \) = \(27\)
Question 9 Explanation: 
Topics: Laws of exponents, order of operations, interpret absolute value (Objective 0019).
Question 10

The "houses" below are made of toothpicks and gum drops.

Which of the following does not represent the number of gumdrops in a row of h houses?

A
\( \large 2+3h\)
Hint:
Think of this as start with 2 gumdrops on the left wall, and then add 3 gumdrops for each house.
B
\( \large 5+3(h-1)\)
Hint:
Think of this as start with one house, and then add 3 gumdrops for each of the other h-1 houses.
C
\( \large h+(h+1)+(h+1)\)
Hint:
Look at the gumdrops in 3 rows: h gumdrops for the "rooftops," h+1 for the tops of the vertical walls, and h+1 for the floors.
D
\( \large 5+3h\)
Hint:
This one is not a correct equation (which makes it the correct answer!). Compare to choice A. One of them has to be wrong, as they differ by 3.
Question 10 Explanation: 
Topic: Translate among different representations (e.g., tables, graphs, algebraic expressions, verbal descriptions) of functional relationships (Objective 0021).
There are 10 questions to complete.

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