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I used the official objectives and sample test to construct these questions, but cannot promise that they accurately reflect what’s on the real test.   Some of the sample questions were more convoluted than I could bear to write.   See terms of use.   See the MTEL Practice Test main page to view questions on a particular topic or to download paper practice tests.

MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice


Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1

Use the graph below to answer the question that follows:

The graph above represents the equation \( \large 3x+Ay=B\), where A and B are integers.  What are the values of A and B?

A
\( \large A = -2, B= 6\)
Hint:
Plug in (2,0) to get B=6, then plug in (0,-3) to get A=-2.
B
\( \large A = 2, B = 6\)
Hint:
Try plugging (0,-3) into this equation.
C
\( \large A = -1.5, B=-3\)
Hint:
The problem said that A and B were integers and -1.5 is not an integer. Don't try to use slope-intercept form.
D
\( \large A = 2, B = -3\)
Hint:
Try plugging (2,0) into this equation.
Question 1 Explanation: 
Topic: Find a linear equation that represents a graph (Objective 0022).
Question 2

Which of the following points is closest to \( \dfrac{34}{135} \times \dfrac{53}{86}\)?

A

A

Hint:
\(\frac{34}{135} \approx \frac{1}{4}\) and \( \frac{53}{86} \approx \frac {2}{3}\). \(\frac {1}{4}\) of \(\frac {2}{3}\) is small and closest to A.
B

B

Hint:
Estimate with simpler fractions.
C

C

Hint:
Estimate with simpler fractions.
D

D

Hint:
Estimate with simpler fractions.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Understand meaning and models of operations on fractions (Objective 0019).
Question 3

At a school fundraising event, people can buy a ticket to spin a spinner like the one below.  The region that the spinner lands in tells which, if any, prize the person wins.

If 240 people buy tickets to spin the spinner, what is the best estimate of the number of keychains that will be given away?

A

40

Hint:
"Keychain" appears on the spinner twice.
B

80

Hint:
The probability of getting a keychain is 1/3, and so about 1/3 of the time the spinner will win.
C

100

Hint:
What is the probability of winning a keychain?
D

120

Hint:
That would be the answer for getting any prize, not a keychain specifically.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Topic: I would call this topic expected value, which is not listed on the objectives. This question is very similar to one on the sample test. It's not a good question in that it's oversimplified (a more difficult and interesting question would be something like, "The school bought 100 keychains for prizes, what is the probability that they will run out before 240 people play?"). In any case, I believe the objective this is meant for is, "Recognize the difference between experimentally and theoretically determined probabilities in real-world situations. (Objective 0026)." This is not something easily assessed with multiple choice .
Question 4

Some children explored the diagonals in 2 x 2 squares on pages of a calendar (where all four squares have numbers in them).  They conjectured that the sum of the diagonals is always equal; in the example below, 8+16=9+15.

 

Which of the equations below could best be used to explain why the children's conjecture is correct?

A
\( \large 8x+16x=9x+15x\)
Hint:
What would x represent in this case? Make sure you can describe in words what x represents.
B
\( \large x+(x+2)=(x+1)+(x+1)\)
Hint:
What would x represent in this case? Make sure you can describe in words what x represents.
C
\( \large x+(x+8)=(x+1)+(x+7)\)
Hint:
x is the number in the top left square, x+8 is one below and to the right, x+1 is to the right of x, and x+7 is below x.
D
\( \large x+8+16=x+9+15\)
Hint:
What would x represent in this case? Make sure you can describe in words what x represents.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and apply the concepts of variable, equality, and equation to express relationships algebraically (Objective 0020).
Question 5

Which of the numbers below is not equivalent to 4%?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{25}\)
Hint:
1/25=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
B
\( \large \dfrac{4}{100}\)
Hint:
4/100=4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
C
\( \large 0.4\)
Hint:
0.4=40% so this is not equal to 4%
D
\( \large 0.04\)
Hint:
0.04=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
Question 5 Explanation: 
Converting between fractions, decimals, and percents (Objective 0017).
Question 6

Below are front, side, and top views of a three-dimensional solid.

Which of the following could be the solid shown above?

A

A sphere

Hint:
All views would be circles.
B

A cylinder

C

A cone

Hint:
Two views would be triangles, not rectangles.
D

A pyramid

Hint:
How would one view be a circle?
Question 6 Explanation: 
Topic: Match three-dimensional figures and their two-dimensional representations (e.g., nets, projections, perspective drawings) (Objective 0024).
Question 7

A solution requires 4 ml of saline for every 7 ml of medicine. How much saline would be required for 50 ml of medicine?

A
\( \large 28 \dfrac{4}{7}\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. The extra ml of saline requires 4 ml saline/ 7 ml medicine = 4/7 ml saline per 1 ml medicine.
B
\( \large 28 \dfrac{1}{4}\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. How much saline does the extra ml require?
C
\( \large 28 \dfrac{1}{7}\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. How much saline does the extra ml require?
D
\( \large 87.5\) ml
Hint:
49 ml of medicine requires 28 ml of saline. How much saline does the extra ml require?
Question 7 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply proportional thinking to estimate quantities in real world situations (Objective 0019).
Question 8

Below is a pictorial representation of \(2\dfrac{1}{2}\div \dfrac{2}{3}\):

Which of the following is the best description of how to find the quotient from the picture?

A

The quotient is \(3\dfrac{3}{4}\). There are 3 whole blocks each representing \(\dfrac{2}{3}\) and a partial block composed of 3 small rectangles. The 3 small rectangles represent \(\dfrac{3}{4}\) of \(\dfrac{2}{3}\).

B

The quotient is \(3\dfrac{1}{2}\). There are 3 whole blocks each representing \(\dfrac{2}{3}\) and a partial block composed of 3 small rectangles. The 3 small rectangles represent \(\dfrac{3}{6}\) of a whole, or \(\dfrac{1}{2}\).

Hint:
We are counting how many 2/3's are in
2 1/2: the unit becomes 2/3, not 1.
C

The quotient is \(\dfrac{4}{15}\). There are four whole blocks separated into a total of 15 small rectangles.

Hint:
This explanation doesn't make much sense. Probably you are doing "invert and multiply," but inverting the wrong thing.
D

This picture cannot be used to find the quotient because it does not show how to separate \(2\dfrac{1}{2}\) into equal sized groups.

Hint:
Study the measurement/quotative model of division. It's often very useful with fractions.
Question 8 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and analyze pictorial representations of number operations. (Objective 0019).
Question 9

A biology class requires a lab fee, which is a whole number of dollars, and the same amount for all students. On Monday the instructor collected $70 in fees, on Tuesday she collected $126, and on Wednesday she collected $266. What is the largest possible amount the fee could be?

A

$2

Hint:
A possible fee, but not the largest possible fee. Check the other choices to see which are factors of all three numbers.
B

$7

Hint:
A possible fee, but not the largest possible fee. Check the other choices to see which are factors of all three numbers.
C

$14

Hint:
This is the greatest common factor of 70, 126, and 266.
D

$70

Hint:
Not a factor of 126 or 266, so couldn't be correct.
Question 9 Explanation: 
Topic: Use GCF in real-world context (Objective 0018)
Question 10

A family has four children.  What is the probability that two children are girls and two are boys?  Assume the the probability of having a boy (or a girl) is 50%.

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{2}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{4}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{5}\)
Hint:
Some configurations are more probable than others -- i.e. it's more likely to have two boys and two girls than all boys. Be sure you are weighting properly.
D
\( \large \dfrac{3}{8}\)
Hint:
There are two possibilities for each child, so there are \(2 \times 2 \times 2 \times 2 =16\) different configurations, e.g. from oldest to youngest BBBG, BGGB, GBBB, etc. Of these configurations, there are 6 with two boys and two girls (this is the combination \(_{4}C_{2}\) or "4 choose 2"): BBGG, BGBG, BGGB, GGBB, GBGB, and GBBG. Thus the probability is 6/16=3/8.
Question 10 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply knowledge of combinations and permutations to the computation of probabilities (Objective 0026).
Question 11

A cylindrical soup can has diameter 7 cm and height 11 cm. The can holds g grams of soup.   How many grams of the same soup could a cylindrical can with diameter 14 cm and height 33 cm hold?

A
\( \large 6g\)
Hint:
You must scale in all three dimensions.
B
\( \large 12g\)
Hint:
Height is multiplied by 3, and diameter and radius are multiplied by 2. Since the radius is squared, final result is multiplied by \(2^2\times 3=12\).
C
\( \large 18g\)
Hint:
Don't square the height scale factor.
D
\( \large 36g\)
Hint:
Don't square the height scale factor.
Question 11 Explanation: 
Topic: Determine how the characteristics (e.g., area, volume) of geometric figures and shapes are affected by changes in their dimensions (Objective 0023).
Question 12

Use the samples of a student's work below to answer the question that follows:

\( \large \dfrac{2}{3}\times \dfrac{3}{4}=\dfrac{4\times 2}{3\times 3}=\dfrac{8}{9}\) \( \large \dfrac{2}{5}\times \dfrac{7}{7}=\dfrac{7\times 2}{5\times 7}=\dfrac{2}{5}\) \( \large \dfrac{7}{6}\times \dfrac{3}{4}=\dfrac{4\times 7}{6\times 3}=\dfrac{28}{18}=\dfrac{14}{9}\)

Which of the following best describes the mathematical validity of the algorithm the student is using?

A

It is not valid. It never produces the correct answer.

Hint:
In the middle example,the answer is correct.
B

It is not valid. It produces the correct answer in a few special cases, but it‘s still not a valid algorithm.

Hint:
Note that this algorithm gives a/b divided by c/d, not a/b x c/d, but some students confuse multiplication and cross-multiplication. If a=0 or if c/d =1, division and multiplication give the same answer.
C

It is valid if the rational numbers in the multiplication problem are in lowest terms.

Hint:
Lowest terms is irrelevant.
D

It is valid for all rational numbers.

Hint:
Can't be correct as the first and last examples have the wrong answers.
Question 12 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze Non-Standard Computational Algorithms (Objective 0019).
Question 13

What is the mathematical name of the three-dimensional polyhedron depicted below?

A

Tetrahedron

Hint:
All the faces of a tetrahedron are triangles.
B

Triangular Prism

Hint:
A prism has two congruent, parallel bases, connected by parallelograms (since this is a right prism, the parallelograms are rectangles).
C

Triangular Pyramid

Hint:
A pyramid has one base, not two.
D

Trigon

Hint:
A trigon is a triangle (this is not a common term).
Question 13 Explanation: 
Topic: Classify and analyze three-dimensional figures using attributes of faces, edges, and vertices (Objective 0024).
Question 14

A family went on a long car trip.  Below is a graph of how far they had driven at each hour.

Which of the following is closest to their average speed driving on the trip?

 
A
\( \large d=20t\)
Hint:
Try plugging t=7 into the equation, and see how it matches the graph.
B
\( \large d=30t\)
Hint:
Try plugging t=7 into the equation, and see how it matches the graph.
C
\( \large d=40t\)
D
\( \large d=50t\)
Hint:
Try plugging t=7 into the equation, and see how it matches the graph.
Question 14 Explanation: 
Topic: Select the linear equation that best models a real-world situation (Objective 0022).
Question 15

The polygon depicted below is drawn on dot paper, with the dots spaced 1 unit apart.  What is the perimeter of the polygon?

A
\( \large 18+\sqrt{2} \text{ units}\)
Hint:
Be careful with the Pythagorean Theorem.
B
\( \large 18+2\sqrt{2}\text{ units}\)
Hint:
There are 13 horizontal or vertical 1 unit segments. The longer diagonal is the hypotenuse of a 3-4-5 right triangle, so its length is 5 units. The shorter diagonal is the hypotenuse of a 45-45-90 right triangle with side 2, so its hypotenuse has length \(2 \sqrt{2}\).
C
\( \large 18 \text{ units} \)
Hint:
Use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the lengths of the diagonal segments.
D
\( \large 20 \text{ units}\)
Hint:
Use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the lengths of the diagonal segments.
Question 15 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and apply connections between algebra and geometry (e.g., the use of coordinate systems, the Pythagorean theorem) (Objective 0024).
Question 16

What is the greatest common factor of 540 and 216?

A
\( \large{{2}^{2}}\cdot {{3}^{3}}\)
Hint:
One way to solve this is to factor both numbers: \(540=2^2 \cdot 3^3 \cdot 5\) and \(216=2^3 \cdot 3^3\). Then take the smaller power for each prime that is a factor of both numbers.
B
\( \large2\cdot 3\)
Hint:
This is a common factor of both numbers, but it's not the greatest common factor.
C
\( \large{{2}^{3}}\cdot {{3}^{3}}\)
Hint:
\(2^3 = 8\) is not a factor of 540.
D
\( \large{{2}^{2}}\cdot {{3}^{2}}\)
Hint:
This is a common factor of both numbers, but it's not the greatest common factor.
Question 16 Explanation: 
Topic: Find the greatest common factor of a set of numbers (Objective 0018).
Question 17

Here is a student's work solving an equation:

\( x-4=-2x+6\)

\( x-4+4=-2x+6+4\)

\( x=-2x+10\)

\( x-2x=10\)

\( x=10\)

Which of the following statements is true?

A

The student‘s solution is correct.

Hint:
Try plugging into the original solution.
B

The student did not correctly use properties of equality.

Hint:
After \( x=-2x+10\), the student subtracted 2x on the left and added 2x on the right.
C

The student did not correctly use the distributive property.

Hint:
Distributive property is \(a(b+c)=ab+ac\).
D

The student did not correctly use the commutative property.

Hint:
Commutative property is \(a+b=b+a\) or \(ab=ba\).
Question 17 Explanation: 
Topic: Justify algebraic manipulations by application of the properties of equality, the order of operations, the number properties, and the order properties (Objective 0020).
Question 18

Use the graph below to answer the question that follows.

If the polygon shown above is reflected about the y axis and then rotated 90 degrees clockwise about the origin, which of the following graphs is the result?

A
Hint:
Try following the point (1,4) to see where it goes after each transformation.
B
C
Hint:
Make sure you're reflecting in the correct axis.
D
Hint:
Make sure you're rotating the correct direction.
Question 18 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze and apply geometric transformations (e.g., translations, rotations, reflections, dilations); relate them to concepts of symmetry, similarity, and congruence; and use these concepts to solve problems (Objective 0024).
Question 19

Aya and Kendra want to estimate the height of a tree. On a sunny day, Aya measures Kendra's shadow as 3 meters long, and Kendra measures the tree's shadow as 15 meters long. Kendra is 1.5 meters tall. How tall is the tree?

A

7.5 meters

Hint:
Here is a picture, note that the large and small right triangles are similar:

One way to do the problem is to note that there is a dilation (scale) factor of 5 on the shadows, so there must be that factor on the heights too. Another way is to note that the shadows are twice as long as the heights.
B

22.5 meters

Hint:
Draw a picture.
C

30 meters

Hint:
Draw a picture.
D

45 meters

Hint:
Draw a picture.
Question 19 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply geometric transformations (e.g., translations, rotations, reflections, dilations); relate them to similarity, ; and use these concepts to solve problems (Objective 0024) . Fits in other places too.
Question 20

There are six gumballs in a bag — two red and four green.  Six children take turns picking a gumball out of the bag without looking.   They do not return any gumballs to the bag.  What is the probability that the first two children to pick from the bag pick the red gumballs?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{3}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that the first child picks a red gumball, but not that the first two children pick red gumballs.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{8}\)
Hint:
Are you adding things that you should be multiplying?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{9}\)
Hint:
This would be the probability if the gumballs were returned to the bag.
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{15}\)
Hint:
The probability that the first child picks red is 2/6 = 1/3. Then there are 5 gumballs in the bag, one red, so the probability that the second child picks red is 1/5. Thus 1/5 of the time, after the first child picks red, the second does too, so the probability is 1/5 x 1/3 = 1/15.
Question 20 Explanation: 
Topic: Calculate the probabilities of simple and compound events and of independent and dependent events (Objective 0026).
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